2012 Webinar Series

Contact the Sustainable Microenterprise and Development Program

E-mail: smdp.info@unh.edu
Phone:
(603) 862-0764
Fax: (603) 862-3878

The Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire
Huddleston Hall
73 Main Street
Durham, NH 03824


Sustainable Microenterprise and Development Program

2012 Webinar Series

In response to numerous alumni requests, the SMDP is pleased to announce a new webinar series which will cover many of the topics that are offered in the SMDP training programs we hold in Africa and New Hampshire. The SMDP Webinar Series sessions will be facilitated by many of the same faculty who teach our face-to-face courses. The webinars are free and available for any practitioners wanting to increase their knowledge about sustainable microfinance, enterprise development, or other development finance best practices.

2013 Webinar Series Announced

SMDP Webinar Series 2012 Archive

Date/Time
(Eastern U.S./GMT -5)

Topic  

Facilitator

Pre-recorded.
Click here to watch now!

Sound Practices in Youth Inclusive Financial Services

Veronica Torres
Making Cents International

Pre-recorded.
Click here to watch now!

 

Self-Financed Communities: Exploring Innovative Models for Building Assets and Social Capital

Jean Claude Rodríguez-Ferrera Massons
Association for Self-Financed Communities (ACAF)

No video is available, but you can listen here and download the PowerPoint Presentation 

Microfinance interest rates: What's 'reasonable,' and does it matter?

Malcolm Harper, Cranfield School of Management

Pre-recorded.
Click here to watch now!


Download the PowerPoint Presentation

Successful Strategies for Reaching the Very Poorest

Jan Maes
SEEP Poverty Outreach Working Group

Pre-recorded.
Click here to watch now!

Download the PowerPoint
Presentation

ProPoor Enterprise and Value Chain Development Advanced topics

Katie Turner
Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA)

Download video here.

Download the PowerPoint Presentation

Savings Groups as a Platform for
Other Development Interventions

Paul Rippey
savingsrevolution.org

Pre-recorded.
Click here to watch now!

Download the PowerPoint Presentation

Financial Education on the Pathway to Financial Inclusion

Candace Nelson
Senior Technical Advisor, Microfinance Opportunities

Pre-recorded.
Click here to watch now!

Download the PowerPoint Presentation

Predictions on the Future of MicrofinanceMichael Swack, Carsey Insitute's Center on Social Innovation and Finance
 

Previous Webinars

November

Predictions on the Future of Microfinance

Facilitator: Michael Swack, Faculty Director, The Center on Social Innovation and Finance

In this webinar we will discuss some of the key questions and issues facing the field of microfinance - and offer some predictions on where we see the field heading. Key issues include: the role of government, the impact of private investors, new international players, private aid, regulation and commercialization. Participants will gain insights into policy and regulatory environments coming down the road (the implications of the India crisis), transparency guidelines, the advantages and disadvantages of a more competitive environment for microfinance and impact of new financial structures designed to increase the flow of funds to MFIs.

October

Financial Education on the Pathway to Financial Inclusion

Facilitator: Candace Nelson, Senior Technical Advisor, Microfinance Opportunities


The goal of financial inclusion has been widely embraced, and the right combination of political will and technology make it seem attainable. Yet, consumers will not be successfully ‘included’ in the financial system unless they are informed consumers, capable of comparing providers and products and choosing those that best meet their needs. Hence the link between financial inclusion and financial education which teaches the knowledge, skills and attitudes that people can use to adopt good money management practices. The evolving landscape of financial services for the poor makes financial education ever more relevant, and urgent. Mainstream financial institutions are targeting ‘downstream’ markets; beyond credit, savings, insurance, payment services, and money transfers are increasingly available. Anyone with a cell phone will be able to have a bank account. Yet, while people may handily master a cell phone’s functionality, they often understand little about the management decisions that the keypad contains. New access to convenient debit cards and ATMs presents challenges to those trying to control their spending. In this webinar, we will explore how financial education can respond to these challenges, defining what it is, how it is delivered to consumers in different contexts, and the difference it can make.

August

Savings Groups as a Platform for Other Development Interventions

Facilitator: Paul Rippey, savingsrevolution.org

Click Here to download the entire webinar (.wmv)

Click Here to download a PDF of the presentation

Both local and international NGOs increasingly perceive savings groups as a point of entry for other development activities. These other activities can include training, cooperative purchases and sales, social marketing, financial linkages, and the creation of larger networks of groups. Participants in this webinar will have a chance to examine:

  • What has been learned about combining savings groups and other activities, including different delivery models (called “unified,” “linked,” and “parallel”)
  • The “continuum of choice” (or, who makes the decision to link?)
  • Risk assessment and the dangers of “breaking the box”
  • Financial linkages and why the speaker thinks we have mostly done them completely wrong so far
  • Post project strategies for relations with savings groups: “train and retain,” “train and release,” and “train and transform”


July

Principles for Successfully Engaging with Lead Firms in Value Chain Development

Facilitator: Katie Turner, Mennonite Economic Development Associates (MEDA)

Lead Firms are any small, medium, and large firms that have commercial linkages forward and backward along the value chain with targeted micro, small, and medium scale enterprises (MSEs). They can vary in size, may operate within the formal or informal economy, and can manage and/or control different parts of the value chain. However, they are distinguished by their commercial interest to engage with MSEs and the leverage potential they have to impact MSEs. Some examples of Lead Firms within a value chain could be: buyers, traders, input suppliers, veterinarians, exporters, and processors.

Engaging with Lead Firms, particularly those who are dynamic market actors, can be mutually beneficial for value chain actors. This webinar provided an overview on best practices when working with Lead Firms, including methods for selecting and identifying, structuring and managing collaboration and interventions with Lead Firms. Resources on further work on Lead Firms were also shared with participants.

May

Successful Strategies for Reaching the Very Poorest

Facilitator: Jan Maes, SEEP Poverty Outreach Working Group


The world’s poorest people (1.4 billion) require more than access to finance or new markets to escape poverty. The various economic strengthening disciplines (microfinance, value chain development, social assistance, skills training, etc.) have made significant progress in recent years in making their products, services, and programs more accessible, reliable, relevant, and affordable for the poor. However, ultra poor households (much more so than the economically active poor) will usually experience little benefit from such services and opportunities, when those are offered in isolation. This webinar distinguished between ‘push’ mechanisms (such as social safety nets, savings groups, and asset transfers) that work to provide and protect a minimal asset base, freeing households from poverty traps and ‘pull’ strategies that strive to include the poor in economic growth approaches (value chain development, market facilitation, and financial services). A number of innovative approaches explained how carefully sequenced and coordinated interventions link push and pull strategies, achieving sustainable pathways out of poverty.

For more information on Step Up, please visit http://linkd.in/seepstepup.

Click here to watch.

April

Microfinance interest rates: What's 'reasonable,' and does it matter?

Facilitator: Malcolm Harper, Cranfield School of Management

Click here to listen with MP3 player and click here to download the PowerPoint presentation.

This session looked at interest rates primarily from the client's point of view, considering affordability and also the importance, or otherwise, of the price of loans relative to other features, such as speed and convenience. Our panelist, Dr. Harper, requested that participants do a micro-assignment before they registered for the webinar. You will see during the webinar how Dr. Harper used this data. Participants who completed the assignment were invited to ask questions and participate by voice during the webinar.

Here was the Micro-assignment: Talk to the owner of a micro-business, any activity, but the smaller the better. A newspaper seller, fruit vendor, shoe-cleaner, window cleaner, anything you like, or if possible a small farmer. Find out just two facts, very rough estimates will do. First: what is the total investment in the business, including fixed capital, such as the cart, the weighing scales, the crates, and working capital, the stocks, outstanding credit to customers, cash needed to make change, and so on?
Second: what are the net revenues to the owner, income from sales, or any other income, less costs, of goods sold, of any hired labor (not including the owner her- or himself), of rent, or bribes, or electricity, transport, whatever? Per day, per week, per month; whatever period is most convenient, and if it is not a year, the approximate number of days, months, or whatever the business operates in a year.

March

Self-Financed Communities: Exploring Innovative Models for Building Assets and Social Capital

Facilitator: Dr. Jean Claude Rodríguez-Ferrera, Association for Self-Financed Communities (ACAF)

 

Association for Self-Financed Communities (ACAF) is a Spanish organization which has launched the Self-Funded Communities Model in Spain, Portugal, Hungary, and the Netherlands. Self-Funded Communities are composed of ten to thirty low-income people who buy shares to create a credit fund from which they can borrow. There is no external money and only members can invest in the group. As owners of the fund, they decide the credit conditions – interest rate, terms, collateral – and they receive all the benefits of the credit activity including a share of the interest earned on loans made by the group. It is completely self-managed and self-funded and many of the participants in ACAF are immigrants or disabled people. http://comunidadescaf.wordpress.com/

View this short video about ACAF (Spanish with English subtitles).

Click here to watch.

January

A Primer on Youth-Inclusive Financial Services
Facilitator: Veronica Torres, Making Cents International

This hour-long session introduces participants to the key principles and practices in youth-inclusive financial services (YFS) and offers reasons why a number of financial institutions across the globe are investing in the design of youth-inclusive products and services. Facilitator Ms. Veronica Torres, Director of Youth Economic Opportunities and Master Trainer at Making Cents International, gives an overview on the principles related to effective youth-inclusive financial products, the steps associated with quality product design, and examples of the kinds of savings products that currently exist for young people. Participants have an opportunity to ask questions at the end of the session.

Click here to watch.

The world’s poorest people (1.4 billion) require more than access to finance or new markets to escape poverty. The various economic strengthening disciplines (microfinance, value chain development, social assistance, skills training, etc.) have made significant progress in recent years in making their products, services and programs more accessible, reliable, relevant and affordable for the poor.  However, ultra poor households (much more so than the economically active poor) will usually experience little benefit from such services and opportunities, when those are offered in isolation.  This webinar will distinguish between ‘push’ mechanisms (such as social safety nets, savings groups, and asset transfers) that work to provide and protect a minimal asset base freeing households from poverty traps, and ‘pull’ strategies, that strive to include the poor in economic growth approaches (value chain development, market facilitation, financial services). A number of innovative approaches will explain how carefully sequenced and coordinated interventions link push and pull strategies, achieving sustainable pathways out of